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Category: Freedom & Security

  • July 17, 2014

    The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill

    I take the balancing of security, privacy and democratic freedom extremely seriously. Throughout my political career I have shown a healthy wariness towards the power of the state – though it is of course vital that government be proactive if it is to keep citizens safe in this dangerous and volatile world.   With these […]
  • March 27, 2014

    Conservatives for Managed Migration want a sensible immigration policy, not an open door

    Anyone who has tried to talk about immigration in public will know that to proffer a view is to open oneself up to misrepresentation and endless vitriol. What has surprised me, however, since I launched Conservatives for Managed Migration on Tuesday, is the flood of positivity from email correspondents, Twitter users, commenters, journalists and fellow […]
  • March 25, 2014

    Conservatives for Managed Migration – Launch Speech

    This nation’s economic future depends on our taking the right approach towards those who wish to work, study and contribute here. Flexibility in a country’s immigration system is now part and parcel of being an engaged member of the global economy. International businesses and business people, not to mention academics, expect to be able to […]
  • March 24, 2014

    We need a rational debate on immigration

    This week, Mark is launching a new group, ‘Conservatives for Managed Migration,’ in a bid to spark calm and rational debate about migration both within and beyond the Conservative Party. In the article below, he explains why: In spite of consistently ranking as a top voter priority, for years our nation’s politicians ducked the touchy […]
  • October 22, 2013

    Immigration Bill

    Today in the main chamber, MPs debate the Immigration Bill. Meanwhile, in Westminster Hall Priti Patel MP has tabled a debate on immigration. I paste below the contribution I wish to make to these debates. ‘Net migration cut by a third’ has become a key campaigning mantra in recent months for the Conservative Party and […]
  • June 17, 2013

    The trouble with the immigration debate

    ‘Immigration cut by a third.’ This was the message that proudly dropped into the inboxes of Conservative members the week before last as Home Secretary, Theresa May, publicised her department’s achievements. It coincided with my office dealing with a particularly depressing immigration case. Last September, a constituent brought her new, non-EU national husband to the […]
  • January 28, 2013

    Stabbing on Lupus Street, Pimlico

    Along with local constituents, Mark was deeply shocked to learn of the stabbing of a teenage boy that took place last night on Lupus Street, Pimlico. Police were called to the scene at 18.50 however the sixteen year-old boy, a local constituent and Pimlico Academy student, sadly died at 20.45 in a south London hospital. […]
  • November 30, 2012

    Some electoral lessons from Chicago and Croydon

    It’s the demographics, stupid. This is truly the thread that links November’s re-election of an incumbent US President and a series of disappointingly poor Conservative performances in parliamentary contests. In opposition, David Cameron rightly observed that the presentation of immigration policy needs to be handled with care. It must NEVER be ‘too hot to handle’, […]
  • November 22, 2012

    Secret Courts – A Regrettable Necessity

    Mark Field is the MP for the Cities of London & Westminster and currently serves as a member of the Intelligence and Security Committee. In the battle to keep British citizens safe and our streets secure, we rely on intelligence not just from UK agents but from those of our allies too. That intelligence gathering […]
  • February 7, 2012

    Cyber Security

    The growth of the internet is the defining technological change of this generation. Not only has it transformed the way we communicate, socialise, transact, consume, but it has linked the world in ways seemingly unimaginable even a decade ago. The inevitable impact on the political sphere was clear for all to see last year. The Arab Spring, the rapid coordination of global protest movements, the London riots, the continued dramatic, debilitating drip of Wikileaks – these events were not necessarily foreseen, but they were in part facilitated, and certainly enormously